Our news from New York? It’s All About Color
September 21st, 2012
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Manhattan during Fashion Week is a wonderful thing to behold. It hardly seems to matter if you actually go the shows, because there is more than enough fashion on the street to go around. And the trend is clear: no outfit seems fresh or modern without an electric pop of color.

Even the grey façade of Bergdorf Goodman (above) got in on the act, wrapping itself in an enormous lavender ribbon to celebrate its 111th birthday. (And also, we admit, setting a new bar for completely random anniversaries.)

If you wanted the attention of the style bloggers at Lincoln Centre, the epicenter of fashion week — and weren’t, say, Anna Wintour or Carine Roitfeld — you threw on some color and hoped for the best. It certainly was a wonderful carnival to watch.

It seems the trick to making color seem new is to use it sparingly, as the grace note of an otherwise neutral outfit. A splendidly patterned skirt with a khaki blazer, or a bright blue fedora with simple shirt and pants (in the crowd, above).

All over the city, windows beckoned with their latest … shoes. Coral pumps and cobalt heels looked as delicious as candy at JCrew (above).

Nor did color ignore men at Cole Haan (above): neon blue or yellow soles, anyone? … Anyone?

But the stop-in-your-tracks best window came from Barneys (above). It was a marvelous color story: bright pink Louboutins swam with real pink fish in brilliantly lit tank. This kind of wit and imagination reminds us why our eyes always want to visit Manhattan.

Of course it was marvelous to see color’s continuing resonance, because here at J.Falkner we love to bring on the brights. For example, our playful Parrot birthday card in lime (above), or our happy pink Pig (below). With many more colorful cards to be found at our online store, here.


One Response

  1. Peter says:

    The cut of a garment speaks of intellect and talent and the color of temperament and heart. Thomas Carlyle.

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